A Bookshelf Update

2018-04-05 15.53.55

Sliding the shelves I milled into the bookshelf I made me realize a crucial mistake, and another mild one.

2018-04-05 16.04.16

First, the shelves were difficult to hammer in with a mallet (not the one I used for the lathe assignment because hardwood on hardwood wouldn’t be good) because the left side of the shelves was assembled upside down, and the distance between the first shelf and second aren’t the identical so it made things crooked. I also did not consider hinges before I CNC’d the whole thing. One visit to Home Depot’s hinge section made me realize that pretty fast. Then there’s the double track mark you can see when looking its back. I wanted to face the back piece the other way so that you would never potentially see this mistake unless you were looking at it from behind. Hasty gluing should be avoided.

2018-04-05 16.04.11

I did not leave myself enough room to install any interior hinges of any kind unfortunately so I’d like to take this a step further and cut off the pocketed area around the body’s front frame so things will look more polished and intentional.

 

4 Axis Maple iPhone Dock

A first go on the 4 axis proved to be a very long one where most of the work is done on the design. Unlike the lathe or even parts of using the big CNC, this machine really does everything pretty much on it’s own with little vacuuming required once start is pressed. None-the-less it’s pretty satisfying to hold a 3D figure of something you made in Vectorworks out of a solid block of hard wood.

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Wireframe view of model.

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Isometric view of back.

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Wireframe isometric view. (Showing a future mistake that will be made.)

 

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Top view.

And so,

4 axis

taking a block of maple left over from the turning exercise,

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I measured all the sides with a center finder

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and generally marked where the wood would be cut.

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Drilled a hole with a center hole bit for the lathe end of the 4 axis.

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Placing the wood in the shuck (shank?) (chuck?)

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and tightened the lathe end.

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The 3D model in SRP Player.

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Added tabs to the model after finalizing the Vectorworks file.

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The process beginning – 2.4 hours.

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The Axis.

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Half an hour or so into the process.

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4 axis

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An axis turned once to the right.

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Roughing process.

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Finishing process.

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Finished process.

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Taken off the machine there is clearly no hole going through the wood to allow for a charging cable.

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Left over pieces and cut and un-sanded, un drilled through result.

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Sanded down back view.

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Sanded side view. The cut of the saw made a great design in the wood.

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Since I didn’t have a hole I made my own. But realized using such a thin bit wasn’t a great idea on the drill press. It was bending but didn’t break so I switched to a bigger one and that things a little messy.

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The unfortunate hole on the bottom.

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Back view.

I really appreciate what a rounded bit can do to a piece of wood’s surface. It makes for a smooth effect — at least that’s what I got out of this maple.

Next time I need to remember to make my shapes overlap a bit in my Vectorworks files. I also need to utilize the option of changing the bit mid process so I can achieve not only a beautiful surface and rounded corners, but sharp edges and cut through pieces. Although I made a bit of a sloppy mess of the hole with the wobbly drill press after it all, I certainly learned what I needed to know going into the final now.
………..

4 axis

….And while I was at it I brought out my lathe turned honey dipper to cut and sand the ends off while I refined the ends of the dock.

Finals Brainstorm

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Using a block of wood, I’d like to make an USB Charging Edison Lamp with a Catch-All.

Below are some examples of what some of the components would look like:

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Itemized materials list:

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Block of Wood
(Cherry seems like a nice choice)

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Lightbulb Socket

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Edison Bulbs (long and regular) (already purchased)

The difficult part is finding a usb charging port that has a plug for the light socket that is spaced enough so that I can only show the two usb ports (like the second sketch I drew).

I could possibly use something like this:

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Or this:

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Or I could use a hub but that would probably require a lot of wiring space inside of the wood.

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Dimmer Switch (I would make a knob on the small CNC for it)

Depending on how I go about wiring things, and whether or not I’ll have a dimmer there are a few options for power cords:

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I could also just have the dimmer directly on the socket, but then I’m not sure how to wire up the usb cable.

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I could potentially use a simple extension cord if I wanted to use a USB hub mounted on the inside of the box…which makes me now think that I shouldn’t be using a solid piece of wood to make this out of!

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Wooden Mallet

I used an oak dowel and a maple rectangle of wood to make a mallet on the lathe.
Mallet
After finding the center of both pieces, I loaded the block to shape into a cylinder first.
Mallet
Greatly underestimating the time it would take to bring a rectangle to something manageable.
Mallet
My first half an hour I was shocked to have only made a little progress.
Mallet
This was the first time I had ever tried turning something that wasn’t already rounded, and it definitely made me reconsider my time management.
Mallet
Slowly but surely, things began to take shape.
Mallet
After two hours it looked like this:
Mallet
Which then turned into a slightly rough version of what I wanted the head to look like.
Mallet
After sanding down with a number of different grits, I remembered wanting to make two grooves in the ends of the head.
Mallet
I took an even finer sandpaper to the grain to get into the grooves I just made.
Mallet
After taking it off the lathe, it was time to make a 1″ hole for the handle. For the first time I learned how to use the drill press, and realized that it’s a bit lopsided unfortunately.
Mallet
Making the two 90 degree holes on either side of the 1″ hole I had just made didn’t turn out the way I wanted it to.
Mallet
The hole for the handle wasn’t deep enough, and I had made one of the 90 degree angle holes a little less than 90 degrees on one side so I had to go back and make the handle hole larger to supplement the mistake.
Mallet
Although the holes were not positioned precisely, I managed to get deepen the handle hole which helped make up for the misaligned hole on the right.
Mallet
I measured the width of the hole for the handle and carefully started to turn the oak into a handle with the proper 1″ diameter at the end.
Mallet
After gluing the two parts together it looked pretty good — although the mallet head was a little off center due to the misalignment of the drill press and having to re-drill the hole and a second time.
Mallet
Once the glue had dried for about half an hour I applied a shiny coat of tung oil.
Mallet
In the morning, I realized the tung oil didn’t take very well and decided to wax the whole thing instead on the lathe.

The Wood Lathe

2018-04-03 16.16.30

What an amazing tool. The lathe was pure fun. My hands were shaking once I finished for some time after turning two dowels. There was certainly a difference between the pine and oak wood. Every time I thought I had something smooth to work with on the pine it ended up looking really jagged along the grain. And it didn’t turn into butter like the oak did once you smoothed and rounded off everything.

2018-04-03 16.19.06

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I started under the assumption that I wanted to technically follow the turning chisel layout and found the center of the wood using the center finder.

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Then, I hammered the drive center into the wood, and attached the live center, aligning everything by tightening the bolt on the left end of the lathe.

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Once everything seemed sturdy I attached the tool rest approximately to the middle of the material and in pretty close proximity.

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Because I assumed following the diagram would be the best way to start, I marked the parts I needed to lathe accordingly…

2018-04-03 17.19.26

only to quickly notice I wanted to experiment with shapes and see what happened. I liked the outcome. It sort of reminds me of a huge honey dipper.

2018-04-03 17.24.53

After using two grades of sandpaper, 400 and 220, I had a pretty smooth piece of lathed wood — and I was ready to see what oak felt like.

2018-04-03 17.30.31

Muscle memory helped me quickly place a new piece of dowel.

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And after about 25 minutes, I had something interesting I liked to use for a handle.

2018-04-03 18.12.46

The two pieces, unfinished, but taken off the lathe and ready to be varnished.

Final Ideas

1. Building upon the idea of something coming from nothing, I’d like to illustrate concepts surrounding the illusion of free speech within the construct of how we digest information online and through other sources today in age. One idea would be to work with the ridiculous idea of “alternative facts” to see how people can literally create illusions of truth, basically something out of nothing.

2. Creating some sort of true mirror that builds upon the illusion of how we think we appear to others – which isn’t really what it seems when you look at a regular mirror. It would be interesting to create an interactive experience that would allow the viewer to see a side how other people perceive them. A different take on the true mirror possibly employing projection mapping.

3. Our memories can lead us to believe that something happened to us in a way in which it actually didn’t. These illusions that we believe based on our false memories can greatly influence the decisions we chose to make in the future. What if we subconsciously lie to ourselves in order to be able to make the decisions that seems more attractive as a way of bartering with ourselves. And who are we without our memories? Can we create different narratives of our lives based on these falsehoods, and what makes these false memories distinguishable from truths? I suppose what I’m getting at is the idea behind false conceptions of truth based in memories and whether that leads to an illusion of truth in our remembrances or just a known falsification we have swallowed so many times, we forget it was a fabrication.